Lost Chopin letters unveiled in Warsaw / Zaginione listy Chopina trafiły do warszawskiego muzeum

Frédéric Chopin Letters Go On Display in Warsaw

They speak of his friends, the troubled composition of his Cello Sonata, his favorite hot chocolate. Six letters by Frédéric Chopin went on display this week at the Chopin museum in Warsaw after having been lost from view since the early years of World War II. The missives date from 1845 to 1848, a year before Chopin’s death, and were written from Paris and Nohant in central France — the childhood home of George Sand, Chopin’s lover — to the composer’s family in Warsaw. It was a time of considerable turmoil in the Chopin-Sand domestic arrangement. The letters were in the hands of Laura Ciechomska, a grandniece of Chopin, until at least 1939, a museum curator, Alicja Knast, said, according to The Associated Press. They resurfaced in 2003, and the museum later acquired them, The Associated Press said.

By DANIEL J. WAKIN

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/25/frederic-chopin-letters-on-display-in-warsaw/

Warsaw museum acquires previously unknown Chopin letters

The Chopin Museum has acquired correspondence devoted to the famous Polish-born composer’s exile in France, where he spent much of his life after he left Poland following the collapse of an uprising against Russia.

 Frederic Chopin was abroad when military conflict broke out between Poland and Russia in 1830. He then settled in Paris, never to return to his home country. The exiled composer spent much of his time writing emotional letters to his family back in Poland.

 Not only is his homesickness expressed in the celebrated composer’s piano music, it is also underscored in his personal correspondence, said musicologist Monika Strugala of the National Chopin Institute in Warsaw.

 “Chopin missed his country, which he left without knowing that he would never come back,” she said. “He was very nostalgic, very sad, but he was also patriotic.” Strugala added that Chopin incorporated memories from his childhood into his music.

 Multimedia narratives

 Now, the Warsaw-based Chopin Museum – which opened in 2010 – is able to shed more light on the composer’s personal life thanks to the acquisition of six newly discovered letters he wrote to those he had left behind in Poland.

The collection, donated by a Polish Chopin enthusiast, also includes letters written by Chopin’s sister to a friend in England, which focus on the artist’s final, tragic years, when he struggled with tuberculosis at the peak of his creative powers.

 Curator Alicja Knast described the find as priceless and the most exciting discovery in Polish musicology in decades. She said the letters are a welcome addition to the museum’s interactive, multimedia collection, which consists of a “narrative line” based on the composer’s letters, as well as audio files and soundscapes.

 “The museum aims to bring Frederic Chopin to people’s attention by bridging the gap between the past and present,” she said. “We try to forget that we [are now living] 200 years after he was born – and are trying to reach out to souls and touch emotions.”

 A different sensibility

 In recent weeks, Chopin has been in the news in Poland for less poetic reasons. A much hyped discovery of a rare photograph of the artist on his death bed was found to be a fake.

 In another development, a Polish foreign ministry-sponsored Chopin promotional campaign backfired when a comic book about the composer aimed at younger readers in Germany turned out to contain plenty of rude words and even racial slurs.

 The authors tried to defend the book by saying their intention was to make Chopin hip, but one critic quipped that, instead, it was bound to make the composer turn in his grave. The publication was relegated to the scrap heap.

 Author: Rafal Kiepuszewski, Warsaw / als
Editor: Kate Bowen

 http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,14941372,00.html

Lost Chopin letters unveiled in Warsaw

03/25/2011

Half a dozen letters written by composer and pianist Frederic Chopin, thought to have been lost during the Nazi occupation of Warsaw, were unveiled Thursday.

Warsaw’s Chopin Museum said that it spent nearly a decade trying to obtain the letters and dozens of other documents related to the composer after getting wind of them in 2003, Agence France-Presse reported.

“The paper trial remains shrouded in mystery, with the trove acquired from its undisclosed owners by a Mexico-based Pole who donated it to the museum,” according to the wire service. “The letters, due to go on display this week, date from 1845 to 1848, a year before Chopin’s death in France.”

The letters, written in Polish, were penned by Chopin in Paris and Nohant in central France and addressed to family members back in Poland.

“The letters were last displayed in public in Poland in 1932,” the museum’s curator Alicja Knast told reporters. “And they were last confirmed as physically being in Warsaw in 1939.”

That was the year that Chopin’s great-niece, Laura Ciechomska, died aged 77. She was responsible for a collection of documents related to her illustrious ancestor, according to Agence France-Presse.

It was also the same year Nazi Germany invaded Poland, sparking World War II. Like many priceless Polish cultural artifacts, the Chopin collection went missing during the six-year occupation.

“In 2003, we received the first indication that the letters still existed, said Knast. “In 2009, we began moves to try to acquire them.”

The museum was helped by Marek Keller, a Polish art dealer who has lived in Mexico for four decades, according to the wire service. He acquired them directly from their owners, who Knast said wished to remain anonymous.

The documents will be on display at the museum until April 25.

In the letters, Chopin not only described his daily life but also his cello sonata in G minor, Knast noted. Composed in 1846, it was one of only a handful of his non-piano works.

Chopin was born on March 1, 1810, near Warsaw to a French father and Polish mother. He fled his homeland amid an 1830 Polish insurrection against occupying Tsarist Russia.

He lived in the Austrian capital Vienna before moving to Paris. Having long had health problems, he died at age 39 in 1849.

While his body still lies buried in Paris, his heart was later returned to Poland and rests in Warsaw’s Holy Cross church.

http://southcarolina1670.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/lost-chopin-letters-unveiled-after-65-years/

AP Photo – – Polish emigre art dealer Marek Keller, right, and Poland’s Culture Minister Bogdan Zdrojewski, left, talk over a show case containing letters written by Polish composer and pianist Frederic Chopin, whose portrait is seen background, at the Frederic Chopin Museum in Warsaw, Poland Thursday, March 24, 2011. A collection of letters written by Polish composer Frederic Chopin considered lost in 1939 have been found and donated to Warsaw’s Chopin museum by Keller who recently bought them for the museum.

AP Photo – – One of six letters written by Polish composer and pianist Frederic Chopin to his parents and sisters in Warsaw between 1845-48 are seen on display at the Frederic Chopin Museum in Warsaw, Poland Thursday, March 24, 2011. A collection of letters written by Polish composer Frederic Chopin considered lost in 1939 have been found and donated to Warsaw’s Chopin museum.

AP Photo – – In this photo provided by the Chopin Museum Thursday, March 24, 2011, the envelope of a letter written by Polish composer and pianist Frederic Chopin to this parents and sisters in Warsaw in 1847 is seen on display at the Frederic Chopin Museum in Warsaw, Poland. A collection of letters written by Polish composer Frederic Chopin considered lost in 1939 have been found and donated to Warsaw’s Chopin museum. Address reads in French and Polish: Mrs. Chopin through Berlin to Warsaw in Poland. Nowy Swiat street at the house of Mr. Barcinski near Warecka street not far from Bentkowskiego (street).

Read more: http://www.heraldonline.com/2011/03/24/2935427/museum-gets-long-lost-chopin-letters.html#ixzz1HjeDXoYc

Zaginione listy Chopina trafiły do warszawskiego muzeum

Kolekcję 47 cennych dokumentów, m.in. sześć listów Chopina, przekazano do zbiorów Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina w Warszawie. Dokumenty uznawane były do tej pory za zaginione. Te najcenniejsze od piątku można będzie oglądać na wystawie w Muzeum.

Wśród 47 dokumentów znalazło się 6 listów Chopina pisanych do rodziny (z lat 1845-1848) oraz korespondencja Jane Wilhelminy Stirling pisana po śmierci kompozytora do jego siostry Ludwiki Jędrzejewiczowej. Jane W. Stirling była uczennicą Fryderyka Chopina. Wspierała go materialnie i starała się otoczyć opieką w ostatnich latach życia. Po jego śmierci stała się ambasadorem dzieła i pamięci o nim. Trwająca pięć lat korespondencja Jane W. Stirling i Ludwiki Jędrzejewiczowej jest bogatą w szczegóły dokumentacją losów spuścizny chopinowskiej. Pokazuje jak wiele zrobiono po śmierci Chopina, by pamiątki po nim zachować dla potomności.

W przekazanej kolekcji znajdują sie również inne rękopisy – w tym jeden siostry Chopina Izabelli Barcińskiej, zawierający kopie wierszy Zygmunta Krasińskiego i Kajetana Koźmiana, dwa rysunki nieustalonego autorstwa i druki należące do Fryderyka Chopina, m.in. bilet wstępu dla dwóch osób na próbę generalną “Symphonie militaire” Hectora Berlioza z 26 lipca 1840 r.

– Mamy kolejne święto Fryderyka Chopina. Zbiór 47 obiektów przekazanych dziś Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina jest absolutnie bezcenny – powiedział minister kultury Bogdan Zdrojewski podczas uroczystości.

– Bardzo się cieszę, że kolekcja trafiła do muzeum jako dar mecenasa sztuki i sojusznika naszego przedsięwzięcia promocyjnego związanego z Fryderykiem Chopinem – zaznaczył minister, nawiązując do marszanda i miłośnika twórczości kompozytora Marka Kellera, który przekazał muzeum zbiór.

Zdrojewski podkreślił, że starania o pozyskanie dokumentów trwały od 2009 roku. Zwrócił też uwagę, że inicjatorką pozyskania kolekcji do muzeum była kurator Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina, Alicja Knast. – Trafiła na fantastycznego partnera – wielkiego miłośnika Fryderyka Chopina; dokumenty trafiły dzisiaj do Muzeum dzięki połączeniu ich emocji, energii i determinacji – mówił Zdrojewski.

Działalność Kellera jako donatora muzeum rozpoczęła się w 1999 roku wraz z nabyciem autografów listów Fryderyka Chopina. Dzięki jego mecenatowi zbiór wzbogacony został m.in. o 11 listów Fryderyka Chopina do Wojciecha Grzymały pisanych z Paryża, Nohant i Chaillot w latach 1838-1849, 2 listy kompozytora do George Sand pisane z Paryża w 1846 i 1847 roku, czy list Fryderyka Chopina do Marie de Rozieres pisany z Londynu w 1848 roku. W roku 1999 Marek Keller przekazał Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina 3 listy; w 2000 roku 8 listów, 9 listów w roku 2003 i 1 list w roku 2005. Keller mieszka w Paryżu i Meksyku, jest zaangażowany w pielęgnowanie dziedzictwa kulturowego. Jest dyrektorem Fundacji Juan Soriano y Marek Keller A.C., zajmującej się popularyzacją twórczości artystycznej Juana Soriano, jednego z najwybitniejszych rzeźbiarzy Meksyku.

Podczas czwartkowej uroczystości Keller wyraził radość, że Narodowy Instytut Fryderyka Chopina zwrócił się do niego o pomoc w zdobyciu kolekcji. “Prawdopodobnie niektórzy z państwa zadają sobie pytanie, dlaczego to robię? Sam siebie również o to pytałem” – mówił Keller. – Po moim wyjeździe z kraju w 1972 r. działy się tutaj sprawy bardzo ważne dla Polski, Europy i świata. Polacy wywalczyli dla siebie wolność w demokratycznym kraju. Nie brałem w tym udziału. Czułem, że mam dług do spłacenia – opowiadał Keller.

– Niewątpliwie rękopisy te i rysunki pochodzą z kolekcji rodziny Fryderyka Chopina – były po raz ostatni wystawiane w 1939 roku – mówiła kurator Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina Alicja Knast. Jak dodała, w 2003 roku pojawiła się informacja, że dokumenty nie zaginęły bezpowrotnie.

– Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina próbuje mówić słowami Chopina. Próbujemy pokazać kompozytora w takiej formie, w jakiej on sam chciałby, abyśmy go pokazywali tzn. jego własnymi słowami – mówiła Knast.

Poprzedni właściciele cennego zbioru chcą pozostać anonimowi, nie ujawniono też, ile kosztował zakup całej kolekcji.

Najcenniejsze obiekty przekazane do kolekcji zaprezentowane zostaną na wystawie czasowej “Ufam, że zawsze będzie można coś dla niego zrobić… (Jane W. Stirling)”, dostępnej dla publiczności od piątku. W gablotach poziomych umiejscowionych w centrum sali znajdują się pozyskane obecnie rękopisy. W gablotach pionowych są listy Chopina do rodziny z lat 40. już uprzednio przechowywane w zbiorach muzeum. Rękopisy są prezentowane na tle widoków Paryża i Nohant. Korespondencji Chopina towarzyszą m.in. autografy Sonaty g-moll op. 65 na fortepian i wiolonczelę. Utwór ten, powstający etapami w latach 1845-47, był wielokrotnie “próbowany” w warunkach domowych, następnie wykonany publicznie na koncercie w Paryżu 16 lutego 1848 roku.

(aka)

http://wiadomosci.wp.pl/kat,1345,title,Zaginione-listy-Chopina-trafily-do-warszawskiego-muzeum,wid,13256001,wiadomosc.html?ticaid=1c045

Fot. Louis-Auguste Bisson

Chopin na jedynej fotografii zrobionej niedługo przed śmiercią

http://wyborcza.pl/1,75248,9304141,Listy_Chopina_odnalezione.html#ixzz1HjgGiWRo

Cenna kolekcja listów przekazana Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina
 
 
 

    Kolekcję 47 cennych dokumentów – wśród nich sześć listów Chopina uznawanych do tej pory za zaginione – przekazano w czwartek do zbiorów Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina w Warszawie.

 
 
 
 

    “Mamy kolejne święto Fryderyka Chopina. Zbiór 47 listów przekazanych dziś Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina jest absolutnie bezcenny” – powiedział minister kultury Bogdan Zdrojewski podczas uroczystości. “Bardzo się cieszę, że trafił do muzeum jako dar mecenasa sztuki i sojusznika naszego przedsięwzięcia promocyjnego związanego z Fryderykiem Chopinem” – zaznaczył minister, nawiązując do marszanda i miłośnika twórczości kompozytora Marka Kellera, który przekazał muzeum zbiór listów.

Zdrojewski podkreślił, że starania o pozyskanie dokumentów trwały od 2009 roku. Zwrócił też uwagę, że inicjatorką pozyskania kolekcji do muzeum była kurator Muzeum Fryderyka Chopina, Alicja Knast.

Wśród 47 dokumentów znalazło się 6 listów Chopina pisanych do rodziny (z lat 1845-1848) oraz korespondencja Jane Wilhelminy Stirling pisana po śmierci kompozytora do jego siostry Ludwiki Jędrzejewiczowej.

Podczas uroczystości darczyńca kolekcji, Marek Keller, wyraził radość, że Narodowy Instytut Fryderyka Chopina zwrócił się do niego o pomoc w zdobyciu kolekcji. Jak podkreślił, poprzedni właściciele cennego zbioru chcą pozostać anonimowi. Nie ujawniono też, ile kosztował zakup całej kolekcji.

Najcenniejsze obiekty przekazane do kolekcji zaprezentowane zostaną na wystawie czasowej, dostępnej dla publiczności od piątku.

Zgromadzone dotychczas na wystawie listy Fryderyka Chopina pochodzą z kolekcji Marii i Laury Ciechomskich, wnuczek sióstr Chopina. Poprzez najnowsze nabytki kolekcja ta, w części dotyczącej listów Chopina do rodziny, została uzupełniona niemalże do stanów z początku XX wieku. W gablotach poziomych umiejscowionych w centrum sali znajdują się pozyskane obecnie rękopisy. W gablotach pionowych są listy Chopina do rodziny z lat 40. już uprzednio przechowywane w zbiorach muzeum. Rękopisy są prezentowane na tle widoków Paryża i Nohant.

http://czytelnia.onet.pl/0,2259948,0,0,0,sensacyjne_listy_w_muzeum_chopina,wiadomosci.html

Wideo po polsku

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHQZGa614Sc

Speak Your Mind

*